Who We Are

The Institute for Socratic Dialogue is a Foundation led by a multidisciplinary team of philosophers, professors, specialists in public management and in business, mediators, communicators and journalists.

We all share our commitment to spread Socratic dialogue as a tool that promotes stability, inclusiveness and development. As a way to promote justice in the world.

What We Do

The mission of the Institute for Socratic Dialogue (ISD) is to teach people, organizations, governments and a multiplicity of groups to re-learn the art of dialogue. Dialogue is the path to develop an inclusive, human-right centric, peaceful and fair society.

The absence of dialogue impedes individuals from understanding other people’s needs. That inability weakens democracy, exacerbates conflicts, excludes the poor, weak and marginalized, and reduces interpersonal trust leading to a declining confidence in institutions. Then human and economic development is harmed and, with it, the prospect of a common future.

Socrates

The ISD’s methodology is inspired by Socrates, the classic Greek philosopher. We all “know more than what we think we know”, Socrates said. We simply need someone else to help us become conscious of our own knowledge.

Areas

The importance of political stability

Development is useless if it’s not sustainable

Inclusiveness: how to give voice to the voiceless

Team

Founder

Sira Abenoza

PhD in Philosophy with a Thesis on Socratic Dialogue
Professor at ESADE Business and Law School

Specialists

Alberto Gimeno

PhD in Management Sciences with a Thesis on Family Business
Professor at ESADE Business and Law School

Pepe Miquel

Founder of Flor de Ceniza, an organization aimed at promoting the well-being and mental health of individuals by the use of Logotherapy

Diego Fonseca

Writer and journalist
Visiting professor of journalism at CIDE and FNPI Gabriel García Márquez

Elena Lehnberg

Mediator with long experience working with migrants and in several NGO

Georgina Hernández

PhD in Anthropology with a Thesis on the Memory of war in El Salvador